* SENATOR STEINBERG’S PROPOSED ONLINE CLASSES BILL

Yesterday’s New York Times (and a number of other news sources) had an article about proposed legislation from Senator Steinberg that would require California’s public higher education systems to accept transfer credits from select online course providers for 50 of the state’s most impacted courses (some of these courses would be Community College or CSU courses but some could be UC courses, they have not been selected yet). “If it passes, as seems likely, it would be the first time that state legislators have instructed public universities to grant credit for courses that were not their own — including those taught by a private vendor, not by a college or university.” The New York Times article is available online at: […]

* SCFA Request for Information concerning UCSC/Coursera/Faculty Contracts 3/5/2013

March 5, 2013 – The SCFA learned last week that the University signed a contract with Coursera without including them in the discussion. The SCFA, as the bargaining agent for UCSC faculty, should be consulted whenever there is the potential for a change in the relationship between the University and faculty, that could therefore be subject to collective bargaining. The SCFA is not taking a position at this point on the desirability or undesirability of working with Coursera. Their concern, at this stage, is the maximal protection of faculty rights and authority, whether faculty participate or not in Coursera-hosted on-line courses. A Request for Information has been made to the university.

* UCSC Signs Contract with Coursera

March 5, 2013 The SCFA learned last week that the University signed a contract with Coursera without including them in the discussion.  The SCFA, as the bargaining agent for UCSC faculty, should be consulted whenever there is the potential for a change in the relationship between the University and faculty,  that could therefore be subject to collective bargaining. The SCFA is not taking a position at this point on the desirability or undesirability of working with Coursera.  Their concern, at this stage, is the maximal protection of faculty rights and authority, whether faculty participate or not in Coursera-hosted on-line courses. A Request for Information has been made to the university. This issue touches on many curricular and academic issues including […]

* “UC Irvine professor quits midway through online Coursera class”

A UC Irvine professor has stopped teaching midway through a massive online course in microeconomics offered through the Coursera organization, saying that he had disagreements on how to conduct the free class for thousands of students around the world.

* Professors, not UC, own their lectures (2000 legislation co-sponsored by CUCFA/CFA)

In 2000 CUCFA and the CFA (the labor union representing the CSU faculty) successfully co-sponsored legislation that specifies that individual professors, not UC, own their lectures, which is very important now as UC tries to move lectures to the web. (CHAPTER 6.5. UNAUTHORIZED RECORDING, DISSEMINATION,  AND PUBLICATION OF ACADEMIC PRESENTATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES see: http://www.ucdfa.org/NashIP.pdf)